I knew my friend Mike’s band Constant Alarm was working on a new album and he was making noises on twitter about maybe shooting a music video so it was purely coincidental when we ran into each other at our local Esteemed Sandwich Eatary a few months ago and I said “hey, if you want help with your new music video let me know.”

A few weeks after that we all found ourselves wandering around Georgetown with a 7D and ALL OF THE INSTRUMENTS shooting this. Our mutual friend David Grossman directed, and I was the DP. After a lot of editing, rendering, color grading, more rendering, re-editing, and some more rendering, it’s done! And I’m really proud of it. So here it is. Enjoy.

If you’re in DC and free late Saturday night, their album release party is at DC9 and you should go.

A few weeks ago I drove out to Dulles International Hairport to take pictures of the Space Shuttle Enterprise mounted on top of a 747 for its journey up to New York City. While I was wandering around the airport parking garages and terminal with a very long lens and no baggage attracting the attention of the TSA, I had time to stop and actually observe things at what I consider to be one of the most beautiful pieces of architecture in America. I was struck by how much fucking land this airport takes up.
As Roommate Adam said when I was working on this project, “the idea that the space you’re perceiving is really mediated and controlled. You don’t get a sense of the scale of an airport since you’re just going through hallways to a cramped flying tube, and you never get an idea of the expansiveness of the ground you’re covering. Everything is so compartmentalized.”
Because I’m an enormous nerd, I loaded up Google Satellite and took about 30 screenshots of Dulles Airport, followed by about 115 screenshots of DC. Stitch together in Photoshop. To keep the scales consistent, everything is taken from the 500ft elevation in Google Satellite. There’s enough variance in Google Satellite elevations and perceptions that it’s not totally scientifically accurate, but it’s close enough for what I’ll all an “art” project. 
Next: Denver.

A few weeks ago I drove out to Dulles International Hairport to take pictures of the Space Shuttle Enterprise mounted on top of a 747 for its journey up to New York City. While I was wandering around the airport parking garages and terminal with a very long lens and no baggage attracting the attention of the TSA, I had time to stop and actually observe things at what I consider to be one of the most beautiful pieces of architecture in America. I was struck by how much fucking land this airport takes up.

As Roommate Adam said when I was working on this project, “the idea that the space you’re perceiving is really mediated and controlled. You don’t get a sense of the scale of an airport since you’re just going through hallways to a cramped flying tube, and you never get an idea of the expansiveness of the ground you’re covering. Everything is so compartmentalized.”

Because I’m an enormous nerd, I loaded up Google Satellite and took about 30 screenshots of Dulles Airport, followed by about 115 screenshots of DC. Stitch together in Photoshop. To keep the scales consistent, everything is taken from the 500ft elevation in Google Satellite. There’s enough variance in Google Satellite elevations and perceptions that it’s not totally scientifically accurate, but it’s close enough for what I’ll all an “art” project. 

Next: Denver.

The Space Shuttle Discovery flew around DC on it’s way to Dulles to be permanently planted at the Smithsonian Udvar-Hazy Hanger Of Awesome Things

I grabbed the office’s 7D, a lens that was too short, and ran like hell toward the nearest high ground (*turns out* it’s the West Front of the Capitol building) to see … this.

Music by The Long Winters. John Roderick’s “Sky is Open”.

I have no idea who the kid was who was yelling “WHY DOES IT KEEP MAKING U-TURNS?” but he was pretty damn cute.